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First Art Gallery Exhibition Based Totally on Google Maps…

Irish artist David Thomas Smith’s “Anthropocene” transforms satellite imagery of cities, sourced from Google Maps, into symmetrical designs influenced by the motifs seen in Persian rugs. Author describes it as a visual examination of global landscapes transformed by the actions and activities of humanity.  Smith says:

“This work draws upon the patterns and motifs used by Persian rug makers, especially the way Afghani weavers use the rug to record their experiences more literally with vivid images of the war torn land that surrounds them. […[ This collision between the old and the new, fact and fiction, surveillance and invisibility, is part of a strategy to reflect on the global order of things.”

“Anthropocene” can be seen at the Copper House Gallery in Dublin, Ireland, through April 16.

Check it out:

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California Court Rules That You Shouldn’t Check Your Location-Apps While Driving

AndroidSo you know you are not allowed to talk or text without your hands on the wheel while driving. But in case you thought that checking Google Maps was acceptable, a Californian judge has made it clear that isn’t the case. The last month ruling by the California Appeals Court says handling a cell phone while driving, even if “solely for its map application,” is as illegal in the Golden State as holding the phone to your ear while talking. But what about using touch screen navi devices which are becoming a standard in almost every new car? It seems that for now gesture and voice control is the future.

source: CNET

 

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