NASA time-lapse shows just how fast the Arctic sea ice is vanishing

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Climate change is for real and it’s increasingly looking like a problem that is already going to affect the current generation in a big way. The latest time-lapse from NASA showing just how fast the Arctic sea ice has vanished in the last three decades is a chilling reality check about the state of our planet!

It’s not just that the ice is vanishing in the Arctic sea, the oldest and thickest ice has also continued to melt away, leaving the Arctic sea cap more vulnerable to the continued rise in temperature – both in our oceans and the atmosphere.

“Ice age is a good analog for ice thickness because basically, as ice gets older it gets thicker, This is due to the ice generally growing more in the winter than it melts in the summer.” – Walt Meier, sea ice researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Arctic Sea Ice Is Vanishing

The time-lapse from NASA below, shows the annual change in the arctic sea ice age since January 1, 1984. It’s chilling to see how much of the artic sea cap has vanished in the last three decades.

 

Video Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Cindy Starr

“What we’ve seen over the years is that the older ice is disappearing, This older, thicker ice is like the bulwark of sea ice: a warm summer will melt all the young, thin ice away but it can’t completely get rid of the older ice. But this older ice is becoming weaker because there’s less of it and the remaining old ice is more broken up and thinner, so that bulwark is not as good as it used to be.” – Walt Meier, sea ice researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. 

The video below is a slightly longer version of the time-lapse with much more detailed explanations.

Video Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Cindy Starr

For more information, check out the article written by the NASA Science team (link).

SOURCENasa

I am one of those passionate “Geo-geeks” and “Geo-people” who is just too excited about everything Geo and Management. Location information and spatial technologies are just too big to take a back seat and watch them revolutionize the world. Always curious and looking for ways to innovate, I guess that it comes naturally by the gene pool I inherited from an engineer Mom and a researcher Dad.